Archive for the ‘Mosque Terrorism’ Category

Jihadi attacks successfully took away 13 Muslims injuring 40 at Karachi & Peshawar in Pakistan.

September 19, 2011

A policeman stands beside the wrekage of a bomb blast site in Peshawar. -AFP Photo

Medium Islamic blast took away five injuring thirty in Pak Peshawar. High chances for more casualties. 

Bomb kills five, wounds 28 in Peshawar

Monday 19th September 2011 | Shawwal 20, 1432 | Dawn News.

Fire Fire everywhere...Islamic peace where ever.

PESHAWAR: A bomb killed at least five people and wounded 28 others at a market selling CDs in the northwestern Pakistan city of Peshawar on Monday, officials said.

“We have received five bodies and 28 wounded people from the blast site,” Doctor Rahim Jan, who works at Peshawar’s main government hospital, told AFP, adding that there was one woman among the dead.

Provincial government minister Bashir Bilour confirmed the death toll and told AFP at the hospital that police had informed him that the bomb was probably planted in a motorcycle.

Peshawar police chief Imtiaz Altaf told reporters at the scene of the blast that “the target was the CD market.”

Jalalud Din, a 35-year-old lawyer, who received head injuries from the blast, said he was buying sweets for his children.

“There was a huge blast as I was buying candies for my kids. I lost consciousness after my head struck a wall,” Din said.

Earlier Monday, a Taliban suicide car bomber flattened the house of a senior counter-terrorism police officer in Pakistan’s financial capital Karachi, killing eight people including six policemen.

Nearly 4,700 people have been killed across Pakistan in attacks blamed on Taliban and Al-Qaeda-linked networks based in the country’s northwestern tribal belt since government troops stormed a radical mosque in Islamabad in 2007. Courtesy : Dawn | AFP.                      

Allah followers preferred a Car this time to make a Jihadi device to blast for Islamic Peace .

The Power of Islamic Jihad. Pakistani security personnel gather at the car bomb blast site in Karachi on September 19, 2011. - AFP Photo

Taliban suicide blast in Karachi leaves eight dead

 Monday 19th September 2011 | Shawwal 20, 1432 |DAWN eAFP

What a depth of Islamic Jihad. More than three feet penetration of Islam under the earth.

KARACHI: A car-borne Taliban suicide bomber flattened the house of a senior counter-terrorism police officer in Karachi on Monday, killing eight people including six policemen.

Senior Superintendent Aslam Khan, who was unhurt in the attack but whose home was destroyed, told AFP he had been threatened by the Pakistani Taliban and knew that he was the target.

The militant group claimed responsibility for the attack and said Khan had been targeted for arresting, torturing and killing Taliban members.

Khan heads the counter-terrorism unit of the Police Crime Investigation Department in Karachi, investigating Islamist militant cells in the port city of 18 million people, which is a vital hub for Afghan-bound Nato supplies.

“It was a car bomb attack on my house,” he said. “I was receiving threats from Tehreek-e-Taliban (TTP). Taliban are involved in this attack.” Several neighbouring houses were also wrecked in the attack, an AFP reporter saw, with four cars being badly damaged and a two-metre deep crater left in front of Khan’s home.

An AFP reporter at the scene saw rubble, mud and pieces of glass scattered over a large area in the upscale residential neighbourhood.

“Eight people including six policemen have been killed and several others were wounded,” Shoukat Hussain, another senior police officer, told AFP. “A child and a woman were also killed. It was a car suicide attack.” Speaking to reporters outside the remains of his one-storey bungalow, Khan said: “I woke up from sleep and saw fire around. I ran towards the other rooms of the house and saw my family safe but bewildered.

“This was a cowardly act of Taliban. I am not scared of Taliban. Let me tell you that I will not spare them in future.” Karachi city police chief Saud Mirza confirmed that Khan had received TTP threats, including one recent written threat.

“We claim responsibility for the attack. Aslam Khan has killed a number of our colleagues and also arrested and tortured many more,” TTP spokesman Ehsanullah Ehsan told AFP in a phone call from an undisclosed location.

“He was on our hit list and he is still on our hit list,” Ehsan said, giving names of several other police and crime investigation department officials also targeted. “They will be killed soon,” he vowed.

The TTP has members across the country and the attack was planned by a local branch, Ehsan added.

Witness Naeem Shaikh said he was taking his children to school when he heard a huge explosion.

“I went across a lane and saw this house destroyed and huge flames around it,” said Shaikh, who lives in the area.

He saw the bodies of a boy, later identified as a second-year school pupil (aged eight or nine), and his mother lying near the house. “The boy’s schoolbag was lying abandoned nearby,” Shaikh said, choking.

Karachi, Pakistan’s economic hub, is currently undergoing its worst ethnic- and politically-linked unrest in 16 years, with more than 100 people killed in one week alone last month.

The gang wars have been linked to ethnic tensions between the Mohajirs, the Urdu-speaking majority represented by the Muttahida Qaumi Movement, and Pashtun migrants affiliated to the rival Awami National Party.

The nationally ruling Pakistan People’s Party, which was elected in 2008 after nine years of military rule, insists that civilian authorities are capable of controlling the bloodshed, despite calls for military intervention.               Courtesy: Dawn | AFP | Agencies.                                                                      

Radical Islam puts a havoc displacement of native Muslims in Pakistan. Islam against Muslims !!

March 13, 2011

Speculations grow about operation in N. Waziristan

The official said about 50,000 families (roughly 500,000 individuals) could be displaced from the N. Wazirstan agency.

By Zulfiqar Ali From the Newspaper |Curtesy : Dawn.

PESHAWAR: The federal government has directed the Fata Disaster Management Authority to prepare a contingency plan for thousands of families likely to be uprooted after a military operation in North Waziristan Agency, an official told Dawn on Saturday.

The official said about 50,000 families (roughly 500,000 individuals) could be displaced from the agency, where speculations about the military operation against militants have been doing the rounds for quite some time.

The army has deployed over 20,000 troops, including two wings of the Frontier Corps, in the agency. The region is regarded as a bastion of Al Qaeda and Taliban.

“The FDMA has received directives from the federal authorities to chalk out a plan in consultation with the United Nations’ agencies and other humanitarian bodies to cope with the displacement,” he said.

Knowledgeable sources said the federal government had not set any timeframe for completion of the contingency plan, but the FDMA had been asked to keep the plan ready.

“We have been asked by the authorities to complete the task as soon as possible, but we have no idea about the timing of a military offensive,” the sources said.

The US government has been pressuring Islamabad, since the Times Square (New York) bomb plot in which a Pakistani national Faisal Shahzad was arrested in May last year, to launch an operation against militant groups, particularly the Haqqani network, to dislodge them from their redoubt in North Waziristan. The Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) had claimed that it had masterminded the car bomb plot.

Islamabad, however, has stuck to the line that it alone would take a decision on the launch of an operation, citing lack of resources as the biggest handicap.

The FDMA, according to officials, had alerted the UN and its satellite organisations to the likelihood of a big displacement in the event of an operation, advising them to make provisions for shelter, food and other assistance.

They said that sites would be identified and selected for relief camps after consultations with the UN and other stakeholders.

According to official estimates, 50 per cent of the families feared to be displaced would take shelter in relief camps and the rest would settle with relatives and in rented houses.

Sources said camps were likely to be set up in neighbouring districts.

About financial resources, they said UN agencies had expressed willingness to foot the bill for tents, food, NFIs, water, sanitation and health. Officials said the average cost of a tent was 310 dollars.

The FDMA is already looking after 148,893 registered displaced families (over 1.1 million individuals) which had been displaced due to violence and subsequent military actions in the Federally Administered Tribal Area (Fata).

About 23,505 families have been living in camps and 125,388 other displaced families have been staying with their relatives.

A recent military action in Mohmand Agency caused the displacement of some 6,000 families. They were accommodated in two camps.

On the other hand, the IDPs displaced from Orakzai and South Waziristan agencies have started returning home.

Courtesy : Dawn || Revista-Amauta || Opinion-Maker.

Suicide bomb attack on Friday prayer kills at least 50, hurt 100 in Darra Adam Khel Mosque

November 5, 2010

  • A local official said 11 children were among the dead
  • The roof of the mosque collapsed with the force of the explosion

At least 50 killed in blast in Darra Adam Khel

Friday 5th November 2010 | Ziqa’ad 27, 1431|| Source : Dawn News, AFP.

PESHAWAR: A suicide bomb tore through a Pakistani mosque during weekly prayers on Friday, killing 50 people and bringing down the roof, trapping victims under pulverised rubble.

The attack in the volatile northwest was the deadliest in two months. Dozens of people were critically wounded and officials feared the toll could rise.

The carnage wrought havoc in Akhurwall village, part of the semi-tribal northwest area of Darra Adam Khel about 140 kilometres west of the Pakistani capital Islamabad.

A local official said 11 children were among the dead and television footage showed villagers digging graves within hours of the attack, determined to bury the dead in keeping with Muslim custom before nightfall.

Although there was no immediate claim of responsibility, a local elder blamed the Taliban and suggested that the bombers could have been targeting members of a pro-government militia set up to thwart the extremists.

“The number of dead is 50 now. There is a possibility it might rise further,” local administration official Gul Jamal Khan told AFP.

“The number of wounded is more than 100. The dead include 11 children. Some of the bodies are beyond recognition.”

Shahid Ullah, district administration chief of the northwestern garrison town of Kohat, said earlier that more than 40 people had been killed, but warned that the death toll was likely to rise.

“More than 70 are wounded and most of them are in a critical condition and have been taken to hospital.”

Ambulances and private volunteers rushed to take the victims to hospital in Peshawar, the main city in the northwest.

Television footage showed an elderly bearded man wearing a traditional white shalwar khamis drenched in blood limping into casualty while a woman shrieking in grief beat her hands against her head.

A private car sped up to the main Lady Reading Hospital with a volunteer sitting next to a body in the boot.

Khalid Umarzai, a regional administrator, said the bomber entered the mosque from the back during the main prayers.

“The roof of the mosque collapsed,” he told Geo television. “It was a suicide attack.”

Local tribal elder Sohbat Khan Afridi blamed the Taliban, saying Akhurwall is the home of Wali Mohammad, who formed a tribal militia in 2007 to rise up against the militants.

The Taliban and the militia, which is known locally as a lashkar, clashed repeatedly in the area but this year reached some kind of compromise in which blood money was paid to the Taliban, Afridi said.

“Taliban are believed to be involved in this attack,” he said, declining to go into further details on the alleged deal.

Umarzai suggested the attack could have been retaliation for military operations in the Darra Adam Khel area targeting militants.

“An operation is going on by the army and Frontier Corps (paramilitary) in the Darra Adam Khel area. We had been expecting such attacks.”

Around 3,800 people have been killed in suicide attacks and bombings, blamed on homegrown Taliban and other extremist networks, since government troops stormed a radical mosque in Islamabad three years ago. – AFP

Courtesy :

Important reading : Attacking shrines and the culture of peace.

by  Husham Ahmed

Hindus, Christians or Ahamadis not the factor, Minorities are being finished totally in Pakistan. Declare Pakistan as a Barbaric State.

May 28, 2010
Commandos take up position at one of two worship places stormed by gunmen in Lahore.—AFP

Fanatic Muslims target Lahore’s Ahmadi worshippers in Mosque on Friday; 80 dead, 100 injured.

Fri, 28 May, 2010 | Jumadi-us-Sani 13, 1431

LAHORE: Gunmen attacked worshippers from the Ahmadi community in two worship places of Lahore on Friday, taking hostages and killing at least 80 people, officials said.

The gunmen opened fire shortly after Friday prayers and threw what could have been grenades at two Ahmadi worship places in residential neighbourhoods in Pakistan’s cultural capital.

Sajjad Bhutta, deputy commissioner of Lahore, said at least 80 people had been killed in the twin attacks on worship places in Garhi Shahu and Model Town. A total of 100 were injured.

The death toll at Garhi Shahu was higher, Bhutta said, because three attackers blew themselves up with suicide vests packed with explosives when police tried to enter the building.

Police are still searching the area as two attackers were still at large.

Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani strongly condemned the attacks, expressing “deep sorrow and grief over the loss of precious lives”.

Punjab Chief Minister Shahbaz Sharif said the incidents would generate greater resolve to combat extremism.

“It’s a reminder to the nation that Pakistan will achieve its destiny only after we get rid of the worst type of extremism and fundamentalism,” he told a news conference. “The entire nation will fight this evil.”

He said one attacker had been arrested. Police in Model Town confirmed one gunmen had been arrested and another killed.

There was no immediate claim of responsibility, but suspicion quickly fell on the Pakistani Taliban.

“It’s too early to say who is behind these attacks,” said a Lahore-based security official. “But my guess is that like most other attacks, there would be some link to the Taliban or their associated militants.”

Punjab’s Law Minister Rana Sanaullah said the arrested attacker was a teenage Pashtun. This, he said, indicated a link to the tribal area of Waziristan and strongly hinted at a Taliban link.

“The prayer leader was giving a sermon when we heard firing and blasts. Everybody stood up and then two gunmen barged into the place of worship and sprayed bullets,” Fateh Sharif, a 19-year-old student, told Reuters from Model Town.

“They had long beards. They were carrying rucksacks.” Bhutta said a suicide vest laden with explosives was recovered from the Model Town worship place, where some attackers escaped. One fired at a television van before the area was made safe.

“He was young, clean-shaven. He sprayed bullets at our van while fleeing the scene,” Rabia Mehmood, a reporter told Reuters.

ATTACKS LAUNCHED AFTER PRAYERS

Witnesses said the assaults were launched shortly after prayers.

“I saw some gunmen run towards the Ahmadis’ place of worship and then I heard blasts and gunfire,” Mohammad Nawaz, a resident, told Reuters.

The Human Rights Commission of Pakistan (HRCP) said it had warned of threats against the Ahmadi community centre in Lahore for more than a year and demanded “foolproof security and protection” from the government.

It expressed concern over “the increasing sectarian dimension” of militancy in Pakistan, which it called “a big security threat to the entire society”.

Friday’s shootings were the worst attacks in Pakistan since March 12 suicide attacks seconds apart killed 57 people in Lahore while targeting the Pakistani military.

Nine attacks have now killed more than 220 people in Lahore over the past year, a historical city, playground for the elite and home to many top brass in Pakistan military and intelligence establishment.

The United States on Friday also condemned the deadly attack in Lahore. “We condemn this brutal violence against innocent people. We also condemn the targeting and violence against any religious group, in this case the Ahmadi community,” State Department spokesman Philip Crowley told reporters. —Agencies

Hindus, Christians or Ahamadis are not the factors. Minorities are being finished totally in Pakistan. The eye-washing statement made by US condemning the present attack on Ahmadis can not refrain US from enhancing the budget to prompt Pakistan against India or anybody coming under the classification of Kaffirs. Rather an authoritative support in America may help the fanatics to build a colosal Mosque near Ground-Zero. No Fatwa from Deoband or Al Harmain or from any place contained any meaning that Islamic Jihad is different from Terrorism. Islam is the Green Book of the Fanatic Jihadis. Islam is against Peace. Islam is inhuman. Simply Barbaric Terrorism.  Declare Pakistan as a Barbaric State.

Islam endorsing terror? Pakistani Ulema and Alem’s Islam is not detached from Terrorism.

May 10, 2010

Some ulema suggest the government’s ‘pro-America’ foreign policy justifies the militants’ war against it. — Photo by AFP

Ulema and terrorism

By Muhammad Ali Siddiqi ||Jumadi-ul-Awwal 25, 1431, Monday, 10 May, 2010

Ulema and Alem’s Islam not detached from Terrorism. The proceedings at the Deobandi ulema’s recent conference in Lahore must be studied less for its expected refusal to condemn suicide bombings and more for the insight it gives into the psyche of a large section of our powerful ulema community.Of equal significance are the fissures that came to the fore between hardliners and harder-liners. Evidently, the latter carried the day.

It was gratifying that at least some ulema — among them Maulana Samiul Haq — were cognisant of the negative impact which acts of terrorism were having not on the nation but on the Deobandi image.

While the delegates did indeed plead with the militants to adopt peaceful and democratic means for the establishment of Sharia in Pakistan, a majority of the ulema, according to Nasir Jamal’s reportage (Dawn, May 2), said terrorism would continue to haunt Pakistan as long as “factors and causes” responsible for it continued. What was mind-boggling, however, was the principle some ulema propounded to establish a link between terrorism and government policies.

Briefly, the ulema at the Lahore moot said that the government’s foreign policy was pro-America, and this obedience to commands from Washington in their opinion was the reason behind the militants’ war against the government. That this war against the government and the army translates itself into a war on the state of Pakistan itself was an issue into which the ulema chose not go.

If one were to accept resort to terrorism as a justifiable means for registering dissent against government policies, then every country in this world must be ravaged by terrorism, because there is no government on the surface of the earth whose policies do not have critics. Let us, for instance, see the situation in two of Pakistan’s neighbours — Iran and India — where government policies have diehard foes.

The nuclear deal between America and India was first agreed upon in principle when Manmohan Singh met George Bush in July 2005. It took more than three years for the treaty to go through the various phases of America’s complex constitutional process and approval from the International Atomic Energy Agency and the nuclear suppliers’ group.

The treaty evoked opposition from key members of the Senate and House foreign relations committees, but to my knowledge no senators or congressmen or lobby groups resorted to terrorism or to threats of terrorism to express disapproval of this aspect of the Bush government’s foreign policy.

In India the treaty aroused intense opposition, not only from the traditionally anti-American parties of the Left but also from the extreme rightwing Hindu parties, including the Bharatiya Janata Party. The press was equally divided, and influential sections of the print and electronic media came out with highly technical opinions from nuclear scientists who argued that the treaty undermined India’s nuclear programme.

The opposition finally called for the Manmohan government to obtain a vote of confidence, and it goes without saying that the vote saw a phenomenon we in Pakistan are quite familiar with — MPs were bought and convicts brought from prison to cast their votes. All along the intensely emotional debate, no party or group started killing India’s own citizens and blowing up markets and schools and temples and mosques because they thought the Manmohan government had sold India to Washington or to its corporate sector.

To our west, we have a theocracy in Iran, almost as obscurantist and ruthless as Ziaul Haq’s tyranny. The clerics have imposed an ideological dictatorship on Iran, the Internet is censored, foreign channels are banned or shown selectively, there is no opposition press and even government newspapers are often banned when they deviate from the official line.

The economy is in a mess, and crude-producing Iran imports half its oil because of lack of refining capacity. The parliamentary opposition does manage to put its views across, but the real opposition has gone underground. But no opposition group has started killing Iran’s men, women and children and blowing up shopping plazas in Tehran and bombing schools in Isfahan or mosques in Mashhad because President Ahmadinejad is pursuing wrong policies.

It is, however, in Pakistan that some sections of the ulema think that killing our own people is a justified way of expressing dissent against the government’s policies.

Mind you, the government’s perceived pro-American policies do not have opponents merely in the religious right. Even liberal sections of opinion — the recently formed Workers Party Pakistan, for instance — are sharply critical of a continuation of Pervez Musharraf’s war on terror by the PPP-led government. But none of these political parties and elements has justified blasts in Moon market or the blowing up of mosques or a girls’ university to register their protest against the government’s foreign policy.

The religious touch to the ulema’s anti-Americanism is laughable. Just the other day, they were head over heels in love with America, and any opposition to the CIA’s overt and covert operations in Afghanistan was considered heresy because there existed an “indissoluble unity” among the People of the Books.

The ulema know the hurmat Islam attaches to human life. In case some of them have forgotten, the blast in the Rawalpindi Askari mosque on Dec 4 last killed, among others, 16 children.

P.S: For some mysterious reason, ideologically motivated governments, movements and individuals, whether religious or secular — Nazi, Zionist, Taliban — are singularly devoid of the milk of human kindness. The attitude of a large number of Pakistani clerics today reminds us of the Christian church’s cold-bloodedness in burning purported heretics at the stake in medieval Europe.

Courtesy : DawnNews.

Pakistani Friends of Jihadi Fire.

May 8, 2010

As in Pakistan, terror groups have turned against the state that nurtured them in Egypt, Algeria, and Saudi Arabia.

Of friends and fire

by Nadeem F. Paracha on 05 6th, 2010||blog.dawn.com

On April 19, a Jamaat-i-Islami (JI) rally in Peshawar was attacked by a suicide bomber. The gruesome attack was allegedly engineered and undertaken by members of the Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP). The irony is that the JI are one of the few mainstream political parties in the country that actually sympathise with the TTP, claiming that the terror group is fighting a war against “American imperialism” and against the Pakistani state’s “aggression” in the north-west of the Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province.

But the irony in this respect wasn’t a one-off. In early April, former ISI sleuth, Khalid Khawaja, was kidnapped along with another ex-ISI man by a group of terrorists labeled (by the media) as the ‘Punjabi Taliban’ (or Punjabi extremists having links and sympathies with the Pushtun Taliban).

On April 29, Khawaja’s murdered body was found in the turbulent tribal area of North Waziristan. He had been shot twice. A faction of the ‘Punjabi Taliban’ calling itself Asian Tigers claimed responsibility. Khawaja was an open supporter and sympathiser of the TTP, and was known to have had deep links with various Sunni sectarian organisations, and within both the Pushtun and Punjabi Taliban groups.

The attack on the JI rally and the murder of Khawaja by these groups have highlighted a bitter truth; a truth that has for long been stated loudly by the current government and various ‘liberal’ media personnel and ‘moderate’ Islamic scholars. They are right to suggest that as far as terror outfits such as the TTP and their sectarian foot soldiers are concerned, a majority of Pakistani Muslims (or for that matter, Muslims around the world) are either ‘false Muslims’ or outright infidels.

Read full article in blog.dawn.com here.

More than 25 people arrested after Faisalabad clashes

February 28, 2010

Pakistani protesters riot after gunmen opened fire on a religious procession marking Mulid an-Nabi in Faisalabad, Pakistan on Saturday, Feb. 27, 2010. – AP

FAISALABAD|Sun, 28 Feb, 2010 | Rabi-ul-Awwal 14, 1431: Six people were injured on Sunday and more than two dozen have been taken into custody in the past 24 hours following clashes in Faisalabad.

Three people were injured in incidents of firing in Ghulam Muhammadabad area of Faisalabad and three motorcycles were set ablaze this morning.

Given the situation, the DCO of Faisalabad said that Section 144 has been imposed in the city.

Later, RPO Faisalabad Muhammad Tahir, Commissioner Tahir Hussain, DCO Saeed Iqbal and SSP Operations Sarfaraz Falki held a meeting with the representatives of various religious organisations to restore normalcy in the area.

Despite being in Faisalabad, Punjab Law Minister Rana Sanaullah and Home Secretary Nadeem Hassan Asif did not attend the meeting.

On Saturday, protestors set ablaze a police station and dozens of vehicles in the area following a clash between two groups, during an Eid Milad-un-Nabi procession.

The clash erupted after one of the groups opened fire on an Eid Milad-un-Nabi procession, leaving three people injured.

Police had arrested around 15 people including the Khateeb of Goal Masjid, Zahid Mehmood Qasmi, on the charges of instigating people for rioting.

Courtesy : DawnNews AP.

Another Two signs of Islamic Peace in Pakistan. Muslims fighting each others. Women & Children in dead bodies.

February 18, 2010

An official suggested the bombing could be a revival of a feud between Lashkar-i-Islam and Ansarul Islam. — File photo

Over 25 killed in Khyber bomb blast

Thursday, 18 Feb, 2010||Rabi-ul-Awwal 3, 1431

PESHAWAR: A bomb attack near a mosque and a militant base in northwest Pakistan’s Khyber tribal region killed over 25 people on Thursday in what security officials said could be a feud between rival militant factions.

The blast struck in the district that straddles the Nato supply line into Afghanistan and is a hotbed of both Taliban fighters and other smaller home-grown militant groups.

An insurgent commander was among those killed outside the mosque in the Dars village of Upper Tirah valley. The attack also hit near a base of Lashkar-i-Islam, a militant outfit with some ideological ties to the Taliban.

Rahat Khan, a local administrative official, confirmed to AFP that a militant commander was among the dead, but there was no immediate information on whether the bomb was planted or caused by a suicide attacker.

Lashkar-i-Islam — which means Army of Islam — have staged bombings in the past and are the target of a Pakistani military operation to oust them from Khyber, but intelligence officials blamed warring extremist factions.

“There are two militant groups fighting with each other in Tirah valley. Both of them are attacking each other. There is a possibility that the rival group attacked the Lashkar-i-Islam base,” an intelligence official said.

“There is no communication system in the area. This is an inaccessible area for us,” the official told AFP on condition of anonymity.

Another official suggested the bombing could be a revival of a feud between Lashkar-i-Islam and rivals Ansarul Islam, which means Companions of Islam.

On January 8, a suicide bomber targeting Ansarul Islam killed five militants and wounded 12 others in Tirah Valley, about 120 kilometres southwest of Peshawar.

Lashkar-i-Islam is the most active militant group in Khyber and is led by feared warlord Mangal Bagh. It has loose ideological ties to the Taliban, but operates independently.

Khyber is part of Pakistan’s tribal belt on the Afghan border where Taliban and Al-Qaeda-linked militants have carved out strongholds. — DawnNews/AFP

Associated Press reports : Bomb kills 29 in Pakistan as US envoy visits : Read Here.

Bomb blast kills at least 11 in Orakzai

Pakistan has suffered numerous bombings over the last few months. — File photo

Thursday, 18 Feb, 2010||Rabi-ul-Awwal 3, 1431

PESHAWAR: A bomb blast killed at least 11 people and wounded another 50 Wednesday in Pakistan’s Orakzai tribal region where many Taliban militants are believed to have gathered after fleeing an army offensive, officials said.

The explosion occurred at a cattle market in the tribal region.

Local government official Liaquat Khan said at least 50 people also were wounded in the Darmela area of Orakzai. Officials were still investigating whether the explosion was caused by a suicide bomber or a planted device.

Pakistan has suffered numerous bombings over the last few months, many of them apparently in retaliation for the army operation in the South Waziristan tribal region.

Though militants tend to target security forces, many of the recent attacks have been at civilian-heavy sites, including markets catering to women and children.

Courtesy : DawnNews/AFP/AP/ Others.

Coming blowback: How Pakistan is endangering the World

January 15, 2010

For a different cause of Fanatic Religion of peace inside Pakistan.

Coming blowback : How Pakistan is endangering the world

By Wilson John

Publisher : Rupa, Rs 595

Book Reviewed by CHIROSREE BASU

There are two types of reporting done on Pakistan. One, the ‘been-there-seen-it’ kind that mediamen in the West are known to have a special knack for. The other is armchair theorizing, the forte of a group that calls itself Pakistan-watchers. The second obviously lacks the thrill and personal touch of a first-hand account, but a long shot of events often provides an insight the first kind may not reveal. That is what keeps research foundations hedging their bets on the armchairwallahs. It is a tad disappointing when a work sinks in between the two stools, which this book does.

Despite the unusual data Wilson John uses, some of the startling revelations he unearths, and brief spells of clearheaded analysis, the book is lost in the heap of information that John feeds his reader. The ‘info’ breaks the narrative in the most unexpected places and leaves one groping for the line of argument. It annoys one to no end because some of this information (not altogether unknown) is repeated, sometimes verbatim, in the later sections of the book. To take just one example, a paragraph John cites with Ahmed Rashid’s quote from a Tehelka report on page 182 reappears in its exact form on page 238. There must have been others, for several times I was left feeling that I had read something similar only a few pages ago. This trait, detected in other “research works” that base themselves heavily on secondary sources, neither speaks highly of the researcher nor of those who edit such works.

The central thrust of John’s book is to look at the way the civil society in Pakistan is changing, imperceptibly but determinedly — a facet often overlooked by critics of the country’s civilian and military leadership. John, however, acknowledges that this change is steered by the Pakistan State itself in order to “justify its overt use of terrorist and extremist elements against its adversaries”. The radicalization effected not only makes the civil society encourage further radicalization but also to become an active participant in the process.

‘In its entire history, Pakistan founding father Jinnah’s vision of a modern, democratic state has never had a chance before the onrush of this hydra-headed juggernaut, the army–ISI combine, fuelled as it is by fanaticism, corporate greed, and lust for power. The single most important task before Pakistan’s citizen’s and its civilian leaders is to break up this cabal.’

Wilson John is a well-known investigative journalist, specialising in matters of defence and security. He has been credited with exposing many controversial deals and decisions in the defence establishment. He is at present a Consulting Editor with The Pioneer, New Delhi.

Much of this change happens through education. As the co-founder of Jamaat-ud-Dawa (a major focus of John’s analysis) and colleague of Hafeez Saeed, the JuD chief, pointed out, it would be impossible to establish the “system of Allah in the world” without education. There are two things that John emphasizes here. One, he tries to dispel the notion that madaris alone promote Islamic education and popularize the notion of jihad. The failure of the State school system has brought in major players in the form of religious organizations and jihadi parties which have set up chains of their own brand of model hybrid schools that make religious education and jihad just as popular as the traditional madaris. (They, in fact, follow the guidelines laid down by the curriculum wing of the ministry of education that makes it mandatory for the schools to enable a Class V child to “make speeches on jihad and shahadaat” and “understand Hindu-Muslim differences”.) And they educate women in enormously large numbers to have control on the mental universe of the future generation.

The second thing John wants to stress is that jihadi outpourings in Pakistan are not the function of economic disparities that have resulted in a class war. Yes, the typical population in madaris may be poor, but the students there are not necessarily more predisposed to terrorism than the products of Pakistan’s elite secular institutions. In fact, the research he accesses show that since the latter lacked basic knowledge about Islamic teachings and the value attached to life, they may be more “amenable to getting involved in ruthless acts of terrorism”. In Pakistan, and elsewhere, that is precisely what is happening. Children of elite institutions are quitting school to rough it out in the terror camps with the blessings of their parents. Or else products of renowned international institutions are coming home to take on their share of the mantle of the global jihad.

The last indicates a fundamental change in the profile of the jihadist. A class apart from the recruits in madaris or those indoctrinated through intense courses in religion who fight side by side with the literate or illiterate in the fronts in Afghanistan and Kashmir, the net-born, e-coached, highly-educated, jeans-clad jihadist is a loner who forms his linkages with global jihad in his room, is less amenable to control than the innumerable fidayeens on the battlefield and perhaps more devastating in his impact on the world.

John goes into intricate details of how the JuD is fostering changes of all kind and linking up the jihadist world through its associations with the like-minded in the Arab nations, in India, the West, and within Pakistan’s bureaucracy and the army. There are fascinating accounts of Lashkar-e-Toiba camps, of indoctrination meetings where women sacrifice their sons as easily as their jewels to the cause. Incidentally, many of these are attributed either to reporters or analysts who are not named in the text or in the footnotes, which appear generously at the end of the pages.

John’s analyses, when they are not swamped by information, are remarkable. Consider the Pakistan army operation in Waziristan, the failure of which he blames as much on the inaction of the allied forces as on the sentimentalism of the Pakistan army officers. He also does an enormously useful summary of the jihadi movement in India and the jihadist linkages in Kashmir. However, one cannot rate his sensational account of ISI officers and Pervez Musharraf as highly. Nor can one give him the credit he lays claim on for prophesying that terrorist groups will “adopt new techniques or a combination of old modus operandi” to launch future attacks on India. That, one dares say, is obvious.

Posted by : MR.

Courtesy: The Telegraph, Kolkata.

“Pakistan Security Report 2009” …….. A True Face of Religion of Peace in Pakistan.

January 11, 2010

Pakistani Face of Islam 2009. `12,632 people dead and 12,815 injured’.`380 killed in 8 attacks targeting mosques in 2009’. ‘Over 12,800 Islamic militants caught in 2009’.

by Mijanur Rahaman.

What these religious Muslims are doing ?? Over 12,800 suspected militants were arrested during operations conducted by law-enforcement agencies and armed forces across the country in 2009. — Photo by AP

Most of the Muslims believe Islam as a Religion of Peace. Most of them are also proud of it.  The actualities can be derived from the recent report published by Pak Institute for Peace Studies (PIPS), a self acclaimed independent think-tank, under the title “Pakistan Security Report 2009”. Every proud Muslim have to ponder over the situation under Practical Islam of increasing violence and the deterrent development of Pakistan in all respect.

The report titled “Pakistan Security Report 2009” released by Pak Institute for Peace Studies (PIPS), an independent think-tank, said that compared to 313 operational attacks conducted in 2008, 596 were carried out by security forces in 2009.

As per the report published on last sunday, over 12,800 suspected militants, 75 of them belonging to Al Qaeda and 9,739 local Taliban or members of other banned groups, were arrested during operations conducted by law-enforcement agencies and armed forces across the country in 2009.

“If the casualties in terrorist attacks, operational attacks by the security forces and their clashes with the militants, inter-tribal clashes and the cross-border attacks of the US and Nato forces in Fata are counted, the overall casualties amount to 12,632 people dead and 12,815 injured.”

In 2009, the report says, 2,586 terrorist, insurgent and sectarian-related incidents were reported that killed 3,021 people and injured 7,334.

The highest number of 1,173 attacks was reported from the NWFP, followed by 792 in Balochistan and 559 in Fata; 46 attacks took place in Punjab, 30 in Sindh, 12 in Islamabad and five each in Gilgit-Baltistan and Azad Kashmir.

The Taliban seem to have changed their tactics and they are now carrying out coordinated attacks, instead of using a lone suicide bomber. Part of that change was evident in choosing different and increasingly civilian targets, such as a university in Islamabad and markets in Lahore and Peshawar, the attack on the military’s General Headquarters in Rawalpindi, and drive-by shootings targeting senior military officers in Islamabad.

Although the number of terrorist attacks and casualties increased in 2009, the government forces were able to inflict heavy damage on terrorist networks and infrastructure in Fata and adjacent areas.

Earlier, as per a report of the Interior Ministry of Pakistan,  it was conveyed that  at least 380 innocent Pakistanis have been killed and 941 injured in the year 2009 in eight bloody incidents of terrorism across Pakistan, targeting mosques with the help of suicide bombers as well as explosive-laden vehicles.

According to the figures compiled by the Pakistani ministry of interior, 52 people were killed on average per month in the eight gory incidents, most of which were claimed by the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP). On average, 33 people were killed every month in the mosque-related acts of terrorism in the first 11 months of the year 2009. The weekly and daily average for those killed during the same period comes to eight and one persons respectively. The odious ploy of targeting jam-packed mosques at prayer time is now increasingly being used by the Tehrik-e-Taliban as this has become a lethal way to create horror. According to the available data, over 50 mosques have been targeted since 9/11 either by the Pakistani Taliban or their like-minded jehadi groups like the Sipah-e-Sahaba Pakistan (SSP), Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (LeJ), Harkatul Jehadul Islami (HUJI), Jaish-e- Mohammad (JeM) and Jamaatul Furqaan.

Claiming responsibility for the Friday’s mosque attack, the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) said the Parade Lane mosque was similar to Masjid-e-Zarrar that was built in Madina by the munafiqeen, and was “demolished on the orders of Prophet Muhammad (PBUH)”. Talking to BBC after the attack, TTP commander Waliur Rehman Mehsud said that his men had actually attacked senior army officers. “Our militants attacked the military officers who were our primary target and we will continue to attack the army,” he said, adding that the civilians killed in the attack were relatives of army personnel and their deaths “did not matter”. The fatal mosque attack comes just a day after the attempted bombing of the Naval Headquarters in Islamabad.

According to the compilation of figures by the ministry of interior and sources of different news agencies, the first such incident took place on February 5, 2009 when a suicide bomber blew himself at the main gate of Al Hussainia Mosque in Dera Ghazi Khan, killing 33 persons and injuring 54 others. The second incident took place on March 27, 2009 in which 92 persons, including 16 Security Force personnel, were killed and over 113 injured. The target of the suicide bomber was a mosque at Peshawar-Torkham Highway in the Jamrud sub-division of the Khyber Agency in FATA during the Friday congregation. The huge explosion reduced the single-storey roadside mosque to rubble. The dead included the prayer leader, his brother, four personnel of the Frontier Corps and a dozen Khassadars (tribal police).

The third such incident took place on June 5, 2009 when a suicide bomber killed 57 worshippers, including 12 children, at a mosque in a remote village of the Dir Upper District of NWFP. Dozens more were injured as a young man detonated explosives fastened to his body minutes before the Friday congregation in the Hayagay Sharqi village. In the fourth incident that took place in the same month a week later on June 12, 2009, 12 worshippers were killed and 105 others sustained injuries when a suicide bomber rammed his explosives-laden van into a mosque during the Friday prayers in the Cantonment area of Nowshera in the NWFP. The congregation was in the second Rakat (part) of their prayer when the bomber in the vehicle, carrying 125 kilograms of explosives, struck the wall of the mosque near the Army Supply Depot. Two soldiers were among the four persons killed on the spot.

The fifth such incident took place on October 28, 2009 when a remote-controlled car bomb killed at least 117 people, including women and children, and injured around 203 others. The bombing completely destroyed Masjid Umme Habiba, a famous mosque of Peshawar, which was situated in the famous Meena bazaar. At least 150 kilograms of explosives were used in the remote-controlled blast. In the sixth incident on November 16, 2009, 12 persons were killed and 32 others sustained injuries in a suicide car bombing which targeted the Badaber Police Station and an adjacent mosque situated on the Kohat Road near Peshawar. The powerful blast razed to the ground the mosque as well as a large portion of the Police Station. The December 4 attack on the Rawalpindi mosque was the seventh such assault this year, specifically targeting mosques.

The December 4, 2009 armed attack targeting the parade ground mosque in the garrison town of Rawalpindi, which killed 44 people including 17 children, was the latest in the series. In one of the worst incidents of terrorism in recent years, a group of six fidayeen attackers belonging to the Tehrik-e-Taliban stormed the crowded Parade Land Askari Mosque close to the General Headquarters of the Pakistan Army during Friday prayers and sprayed gunfire at worshippers besides throwing hand grenades. A serving major general of the Pakistan Army, a brigadier, two lieutenant colonels, a major and a number of soldiers were among those killed in a multi-pronged attack which was carried out in cold blood while violating the sanctity of a mosque by those who claim to be fighting for the glory of Islam. The blood-spattered episode eventually came to an end after two suicide bombers blew themselves up.

The eighth such incident took place on October 28, 2009, when a suicide bomber rammed a car into a mosque during Friday prayer. At least 13 people were killed and 40 other wounded when a suicide bomber blew himself up in a mosque situated in Khurshid Police Line, Temar Garah in North-West region of Pakistan.

The Islamists in Pakistan prefer explosion in Friday prayers in Mosques, mostly they enjoy bloodbath in Friday, they prefer blast among the children in school, in shopping mall, in un-alerted  innocent Muslims in crowded place. Obviously, all these are the signs of peace in Islam or the conspiracy of India, Israel or USA. But all these under the total control of Great Allah through his Quranic doctrines. Great indeed !! Allah ho Akbar !!! Allah ho Akbar !!!!


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