Archive for the ‘Fragmented Foreign Policy of Pakistan’ Category

India-Pakistan Relationship :: A New Hope Always Due.

April 23, 2010

The scale or content of a meeting between Singh and Gilani could be drawn up by Indian Foreign Secretary Nirupama Rao and her Pakistani counterpart, Salman Bashir. – (Dawn File Photo)

India, Pakistan in focus at South Asia summit

Fri, 23 Apr, 2010 | Jumadi-ul-Awwal 08, 1431 | DawnNews.

NEW DELHI: Leaders of India and Pakistan are likely to meet in Bhutan’s capital next week as their nuclear-armed rivalry overshadows a summit of South Asian nations to discuss trade and environment.

India halted peace talks with Pakistan after the November 2008 Mumbai attacks in which 166 people were killed and which India has blamed on Pakistan-based groups.

A meeting between the leaders is seen as crucial because it could help keep alive the idea of engagement between two players whose battle for influence in Afghanistan has a direct bearing on Western efforts to stabilise a region with 1.8 billion people.

“It is an opportunity (to meet) and both sides will take advantage of it,” said a senior Indian government official, who spoke on condition on anonymity.

Indian Foreign Secretary Nirupama Rao said there was “as of now” no offer of a bilateral meeting between Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and his Pakistani counterpart, Yousaf Raza Gilani, but did not completely rule out the possibility of one.

The two sides have been tentative about engaging since their top diplomats met in New Delhi in February but failed to achieve a breakthrough. That meeting, nonetheless, was seen as a small step towards repairing ties.

Differences over the nature of talks have held up a further meeting – Pakistan wants India to restart the peace process; India wants to go slow until Islamabad acts against the Mumbai attack planners.

The United States has been urging the two sides to reduce tension so that Pakistan can focus better on fighting the Taliban on its westers border with Afghanistan.

“I don’t really want to forecast what is going to happen, but let me say: dialogue is always useful, it helps clear the atmosphere, especially between close neighbours such as India and Pakistan,” Rao said before leaving for Bhutan on Friday.

Pakistani Foreign Office spokesman Abdul Basit hinted last week about the possibility of a meeting.

“It has not yet been penciled in. Nevertheless, given that our roadmap also provided for a summit meeting in Bhutan, we look forward to a meaningful engagement with India,” Basit said.

“Let me also underline here, that engaging in meaningful and result-oriented talks is in our mutual interest and in the interest of this region, it is not a favour by Pakistan to India and vice versa.”

COOPERATION UNDERMINED

The scale or content of a meeting between Singh and Gilani could be drawn up by Rao and her Pakistan counterpart, Salman Bashir. Indian officials said hopes of any progress were low.

“Our outlook on the meeting is very clear – it has to be terrorism and what steps Pakistan has taken to bring the perpetrators of Mumbai to book,” a senior Indian official said on condition of anonymity.

The two sides’ unmitigated animosity has undermined greater regional cooperation, an agenda that was the founding principle of the eight-nation bloc of South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) that meets in Bhutan on April 28-29.

Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, the Maldives, Bangladesh and Afghanistan make up the rest of the group.

While SAARC summits are often little more than a backdrop to bilateral meetings between India and Pakistan, the bloc has tried to push forward cooperation in trade and commerce.

Courtesy The Dawn.

Secret Face of the Real Pakistan

April 22, 2010

Secret face of the real Pakistan

When a section of Indian society is keen to build bridges of love, peace and friendship with a neighbour, it is time to take stock of ground realities in Pakistan

by ABHIJIT BHATTACHARYYA*

The Statesman, Kolkata,  April 14, 2010

“Civil society” constitutes the most important public opinion maker in a multi-dimensional society like India. Hence when a section of Indian society is keen to build bridges of love, peace and friendship with a neighbour, it is time to take stock of the ground reality. It is necessary to “know thy neighbour” and to “know yourself”.

Let us begin with one of the largest English dailies The Nation, published simultaneously from Lahore, Karachi and Islamabad. Editor-in-chief, The Nation and chairman of the Nazria Pakistan Trust (NPT), Majid Nizami, stated as recently as on 10 March, 2010 that “freedom is the greatest blessing of the Almighty, Who may save us from dominance of Hindus, as our sworn enemy is bent upon destroying Pakistan. However, if it did not refrain from committing aggression against us, then Pakistan is destined to defeat India because our horses in the form of atomic bombs and missiles are far better than Indian donkeys.”

Nizami revealed to a captive audience that “if one wants to have an idea of what would have been our condition had Pakistan not come into existence, he should visit India to apprise himself about untold pathetic living conditions of the Muslims there at this point of time.” Nizami thundered that “the day was not far off when we would once again conquer India” and that “Pakistan had to play a key role in liberating enslaved minorities from the clutches of Hindu majority” in South Asia.

The potential of India emerging big is unacceptable to the Pakistani ruling class. Or else, how does one justify the unsubstantiated  public statement by the Chief Justice Khwaja Muhammad Sharif of Lahore High Court that the “Hindus of Pakistan are funding terror activities in Pakistan!”

The hate-India attitide does not end with the vituperative and venomous excesses of the national press and Islamabad’s judiciary. It is put into practice with all sincerity and dedication by the de-facto ruling class, the army.

Reportedly, “the Pakistani army is sexually assaulting minority women and using them as sex slaves, alleges the European Organisation of Pakistani Minorities (EOPM), an NGO working for the rights of minorities in Pakistan. In a prayer-cum-demonstration held at the United Nations, it said the Pakistani army is taking minority women away from their families, raping them and using them as sex slaves.”
Reference was made to the case of “Zarina Marri, 23-year-old school teacher from Quetta, being used as a sex slave by the Pakistani army”, alleged EOPM. It was categorically maintained that “the attacks on minorities in Pakistan were increasing” and that “the religious minorities constitute much more than five per cent – as claimed in Pakistani census – of Pakistan’s 160 million people.” The idea is to “intentionally keep the minority population low to deny them greater representation.” All in all, “Christians, Sikhs, Hindus and other minorities are constant targets of attack in Pakistan.”

Understandably, therefore, Pakistan last year ranked as the “world’s top country for major increases in threats to minorities since 2007.”
The story of the unfinished task of Pakistani establishment does not end with a newspaper group, the High Court and the Army. It is only that now the civilised world outside Islamabad is trying to come to terms with the cocktail of rabid communalism, terrorism and fundamentalism for the sake of expanding its political power base through the state-sponsored religious order’s (should one say “disorder”) foot soldiers like the ghazis, fidayeens, lashkars and mujahideens.

The flip side of this long-term diabolical plot, however, is the present masked attempt to “cultivate” the “evil society” of the non-Islamic, (“Hindu”) enemy state of India. Hence the attempt to build a bridge through the Jang group of newspaper’s English daily News. Curiously, however, the Government of India’s ban on this publication 47 years ago is still on. Thus a Government of India notification dated 19 January, 1963 stipulated “The Central Government hereby prohibits the bringing by sea or land into India of any issue of the Urdu newspaper entitled Daily Jang, Karachi, edited, printed and published by Mir Khalil-ul-Rahman from Javed Press, Mcleod Road, or any extract from, or reprint of, or any translation of, or other document reproducing any matter contained in any issue of the newspaper”. In another notification dated 30 January, 1963, the Government of India once again “prohibited” the Daily Jang, Rawalpindi, edited by Mir-Jamil-ul-Rahman. Curiously, the ban has not been lifted to this day.

However, ban or no ban, Pakistan can find its way to the “interior” of the “Hindu India” and get away scot-free for its acts of omission and commission through its media, its biased anti-minority higher judiciary and the army of Islamabad which the Pakistanis consider it to be the army of Islam!

One pities the psychic disorder of the Pakistani ruling class which is not its own creation. It has been in the genes of the “ruling class” of South Asia through the ages. One can get an idea of the Pakistani psyche in general and read the mind of Muslims in particular from the following speech of a liberal Muslim leader (Mr R.M.Sayani) in his presidential address at the 12th Indian National Congress held in Calcutta in 1896: “Before the advent of British in India, the Mussulmans were the rulers of the country. The Mussulmans had, therefore, all the advantages appertaining to the ruling class. The sovereign and the chiefs were their co-religionists, and so were the great landlords and the great. The court language was their own. Every place of trust and responsibility or carrying influence and high emoluments was by birth theirs. The Hindus holders of position were the tenants-at-will of the Mussulmans. The Hindus stood in awe of them. Enjoyment and influence and all the good things of the world were theirs. By a stroke of misfortune, the Mussulmans had to abdicate their position and descend to the level of their Hindu fellow-countrymen. The Hindus who had before stood in awe of their Mussulman masters were thus raised a step by the fall of their said masters, and with their former awe dropped their courtesy also.

“But the Mussulmans were not in a mood to learn anything that required hard work and application, especially as they had to work harder than their former subjects, the Hindus. Moreover, they resented competing with the Hindus, whom they had till recently regarded as their inferiors. The Hindus, from a subservient state, came into the lands, offices and other worldly advantages of their former masters. Their exultation knew no bounds, and they trod upon the heels of their former masters. The Mussaulmans would have nothing to do with anything in which they might have to come into contact with the Hindus. The fall of their former greatness rankled in their hearts.”

Having successfully regained the status of the “Muslim ruling class of Pakistan”, in 1947 which they had “lost to the British in 1857”, the Pakistanis just cannot forget that their predecessors (even if not necessarily bound by blood) were the minority ruling class over a vast majority of non-Muslim people which, at its peak, stretched from the Hindukush to Chittagong and Kashmir to Cauvery. Hence, “once a ruler, always a ruler” is the attitude. And that is the problem. The Pakistanis, thus, given a chance, would like to get as much and as many of their co-religionists as possible under a single religious umbrella to spread the mantra of its rule over India. Unfortunately, some Indians of “civil society” have decided to look the other way to avoid the issue thereby abdicating their duty and responsibility to protect and preserve freedom. That is the “wonder that is India”!

*The writer is an alumnus of the National Defence College of India and a member of International Institute for Strategic Studies, London

Courtesy : The Statesman||Mr. ABHIJIT BHATTACHARYYA||International Institute for Strategic Studies, London.

Pakistan is still dane of Global Terrorism against the world Peace : Indian Home Minister

March 28, 2010

Pakistan must close terror camps: Chidambaram

Hasan Suroor|| The Hindu ||London, March 25, 2010||Published by Alertpak on March 28, 2010

Union Home Minister of India P. Chidambaram on Thursday urged Pakistan’s “friends” like Britain and the U.S. to put pressure on it to shut down terror camps operating from its soil.

Warning that Pakistan-based groups posed as much threat to the West as they did to India, he told the BBC, “The camps must be closed. Training must come to an end.”

Mr. Chidambaram, who discussed counter-terror measures with his British counterpart Alan Johnson during a visit to the U.K. earlier this week, regretted that Pakistan had failed to respond to India’s persistent plea for it to rein in terror groups

“Nothing so far,” was his reply to a question whether there had been any progress.

Asked how could Pakistan be persuaded, he said: “The U.K., the U.S. know the answer to that question better. Certainly, we have not been able to persuade Pakistan. It is Pakistan’s friends, mutual friends, who would have to bring pressure on Pakistan.”

He said it would be “naïve” for Western countries to think that terrorists operating from Pakistan posed a threat to India alone.

“Once you allow these terror groups to train, recruit and build capacity to strike, they can strike in India, they can strike in the U.K., they can strike in Denmark as they were planning out of the Karachi project,” he said.

He added: “No country is truly safe…Don’t think that India alone is under threat. Every country is under threat from these groups and the Lashkar-e-Taiba today is like the Al Qaeda, a multi-country group.”

Security lapse

Answering questions about the recent terror attack in Pune, the Home Minister admitted that there was a security lapse.

“Pune was a case where it slipped through the cracks. Pune was a target. There was specific intelligence shared by the Central government with the Maharashtra police and the government. The area, Koregaon Park, was under a security cover. Three times advisory was given to German Bakery and its managers acknowledged the advisory on every single occasion, but they did nothing. They did not even take the minimum security precautions. So, it is an unfortunate case that I would say slipped through the cracks.”

Describing it as “a blot,” he said the lesson to be learnt from the Pune case was that “when there is intelligence, pointed intelligence and advisories are issued, people must cooperate…shops, establishments, hotels, malls must take minimal security precautions.”

About the Pune bombing’s alleged Pakistan connection, he said: “Nothing so far has been brought to my notice.”

Courtesy : The Hindu News PaperInternet Edition.

India hands over another Mumbai dossier to Pakistan. Can any dossier solve the issue of Terrorism from India or Pakistan ?? Pakistan should take Kasab to own custody to hang him.

November 18, 2009

India hands over another Mumbai dossier to Pakistan

Wednesday, 18 Nov, 2009

ISLAMABAD: India has handed Pakistan more information about the deadly Mumbai attacks ahead of the first anniversary of the carnage that killed 166 people, Islamabad said on Wednesday.

‘The dossier was handed over to our high commission in New Delhi by the Indian ministry of external affairs,’ Pakistan’s foreign ministry said.

India and Washington blamed the November 26-29 siege on Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT) and the attacks stalled a fragile four-year peace process between the two south Asian rivals.

‘Arrangements have been made for the receipt of the dossier in Islamabad,’ Pakistan’s foreign ministry said.

The ministry gave no details on the contents of the file, which it said would be forwarded to the interior ministry ‘for examination’.

New Delhi has put pressure on Islamabad to speed up its investigations into those who carried out the attacks.

Pakistan has put on trial seven suspects accused by India of involvement in last year’s attacks, but Interior Minister Rehman Malik has repeatedly asked India to provide more information to bring the perpetrators to justice.

India had previously provided four dossiers to Islamabad with information relating to suspects and the logistics of how 10 heavily armed gunmen targeted luxury hotels, Mumbai’s main train station, a restaurant and a Jewish centre.

Those in custody in Pakistan include alleged mastermind Zakiur Rehman Lakhvi and alleged key LeT operative Zarar Shah.

India has put on trial Pakistan’s Mohammed Ajmal Kasab, the sole surviving gunman of the attacks, who made a dramatic confession. —AFP