Archive for the ‘Radical Islam against Muslims’ Category

Blast near Shia Muslim procession in central Pakistani town of Khanpur, killing 20 and wounding 30

January 17, 2012

Eighteen people were killed in a blast at a Chehlum precession in Khanpur‚ district Rahim Yar Khan   Pakistan Radio.

Eighteen people were killed and more than thirty others injured in a blast at Chehlum procession in Khanpur‚ district Rahim Yar Khan on Sunday, 15th January, 2012.

Eighteen people were killed and more than thirty others injured in a blast at Chehlum procession in Khanpur‚ district Rahim Yar Khan on Sunday.

The twenty-two injured persons have been shifted to Sheikh Zaid Hospital Rahim Yar Khan.

The DPO Rahim Yar Khan said there is possibility of a bomb blast and bomb disposal squad is investigating the matter.

President Asif Ali Zardari‚ Prime Minister Syed Yousaf Raza Gilani‚ Information Minister Dr.Firdous Ashiq Awan and Interior Minister Rehman Malik have strongly condemned the blast.

Meanwhile‚ Chief Minister Punjab Mian Muhammad Shahbaz Sharif has announced compensation of half million rupees each for the heir of dead persons and one hundred thousand rupees for the injured persons.

Pakistan bomb blast leaves 18 dead

Homemade bomb explodes near Shia Muslim procession in central Pakistani town of Khanpur, killing 18 and wounding 30 

guardian.co.uk, Sunday 15 January 2012 12.19

A suspected home-made bomb exploded near a Shia Muslim procession in the central Pakistani town of Khanpur.

A homemade bomb has exploded near a Shia Muslim procession in the central Pakistani town of Khanpur, killing 18 people and wounding 30, according to police officials.

The remote-controlled bomb was planted near an electricity pole, said Sohail Chattha, the area’s police chief. He said it was set off as the procession approached.

“There was a loud explosion a few yards from the procession and we all scrambled to get away,” said Imran Iqbal, who was in the procession. “Debris was everywhere and a cloud of dust engulfed us. Many people died on the spot.”

Processions of Shia Muslims, who make up about 20% of Pakistan’s population, have often been attacked by militant Sunni groups who consider them apostates of Islam.

Sunday’s procession was in observance of Arbain, or Chehlum, one of the main religious observances in the Shia calendar.

Sectarian strife between Pakistan’s majority Sunni and minority Shia militants has intensified since Sunni militants deepened ties with al-Qaida and Pakistani Taliban insurgents after Pakistan joined the US-led campaign against militancy after the 9/11 attacks on America.

Report from Other Source : Chehlum procession blast leaves 20 dead in Khanpur.

 Source Courtesy : Reuters | The Nation Pak | SANA | The Guardian.

Again Shiite Muslims are gunned down by Sunni Muslim Terrorists in Pakistan.

October 4, 2011

OH ALLAH ! WHAT IS THIS ? MUSLIMS KILL MUSLIMS....

Photo : Pakistanis mourn over the death of their relative killed in a firing incident, at a local hospital in Quetta, Pakistan on Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2011. (AP Photo/Arshad Butt)

Gunmen attack Shiite Muslims in Pakistan, kill 13

Courtesy to Source : The Associated Press

Date: Tuesday Oct. 4, 2011 7:44 AM ET || Ziqa’ad 5, 1432

QUETTA, Pakistan — Suspected Sunni extremists executed 13 Shiite Muslims after ordering them off a bus and lining them up Tuesday in southwestern Pakistan, ramping up a campaign of sectarian violence that has exposed Islamabad’s inability to protect minorities.

Sunni militants with links to al Qaeda and the Taliban have carried out scores of bombings and shootings across the country against minority Shiites in recent years, but this summer has been especially bloody in Baluchistan province, with at least four major attacks since May.

The gunmen who attacked Tuesday were riding on motorbikes and stopped a bus carrying mostly Shiite Muslims who were headed to work at a vegetable market on the outskirts of Quetta, the capital of Baluchistan province, said police official Hamid Shakeel.

The attackers forced the people off the bus, made them stand in a line and then opened fire, said Shakeel.

The dead included 13 Shiites and one Sunni, he said. Six people were wounded — four Shiites and two Sunnis.

Local TV footage showed relatives wailing at the hospital where the dead and wounded were brought. One relative hugged a wounded man as another walked by, his clothes soaked with blood.

Shiites blocked the main highway on the outskirts of Quetta to protest the killings. They also set fire to the bus that had taken the dead and wounded to the hospital.

Sunni extremists carried out a similar attack on Shiite pilgrims travelling through Baluchistan via bus about two weeks ago, killing 26 people.

Both incidents targeted the Hazaras, a Shiite tribe that lives in Pakistan and Afghanistan, where they have also been attacked by Sunni militants. Security forces in the Baluchistan region, who are also battling separatist rebels, have proved largely powerless to stop the violence.

Pakistan is a majority Sunni Muslim state, with around 15 per cent Shiite.

Most Sunnis and Shiites live together peacefully in Pakistan, though tensions have existed for decades.

In the 1980s and 1990s, Pakistan became the scene of a proxy war between mostly Shiite Iran and Sunni Saudi Arabia, with both sides funneling money to sectarian groups that regularly targeted each other.

The level of sectarian violence has declined somewhat since then, but attacks continue. In recent years, Sunni attacks on Shiites have been far more common.

The groups have been energized by al Qaeda and the Taliban, which are also Sunni and share the belief that Shiites are infidels and it is permissible to kill them. The Sunni-Shiite schism over the true heir to Islam’s Prophet Muhammad dates back to the seventh century.

Lashkar-e-Jhangvi, one of the country’s most ruthless Sunni militant groups, claimed responsibility for the attack in Baluchistan two weeks ago. One of its alleged leaders, Malik Ishaq, was released from prison on bail in July after being held for 14 years on charges, never proven, of killing Shiites.

Ishaq was re-arrested about a week ago after making inflammatory speeches against Shiites in the country. He was not charged but detained under a public order act, which means he can be held for three months.

It’s not clear whether Ishaq’s speeches have been connected to the recent wave of sectarian attacks.

Other reports for this topic :

Click here> Angry MPs call for resignations over Balochistan killings..

ISLAMABAD: The National Assembly was outraged across party lines on Tuesday by the killing of at least 13 people in a sectarian attack near Quetta, with some government allies demanding that the interior minister and the Balochistan chief minister resign and the federal government impose governor’s rule in the troubled province. ….. eDAWN.  <Click here.

To take revenge for Osama’s Death, Tehrik-e-Taliban took 80 life of Muslims.

May 13, 2011

Security officials inspect the site following a suicide and bomb attack outside the Frontier Constabulary (FC) headquarter in Shabqadar town, about 30 kilometres north of Peshawar. Pakistan's Taliban on May 13 claimed their first major strike in revenge for Osama bin Laden's death as more than 80 people were killed in a suicide and bomb attack on paramilitary police. –AFP Photo

Twin blasts kill more than 80 in Charsadda, Pakistan.

SHABQADAR: The Tehrik-e-Taliban on Friday claimed their first major strike in revenge for Osama bin Laden’s death as more than 80 people were killed and at least 115 were wounded in a suicide and bomb attack on FC personnel.

“This was the first revenge for Osama’s martyrdom. Wait for bigger attacks in Pakistan and Afghanistan,” spokesman Ehsanullah Ehsan told AFP by telephone from an undisclosed location.

It was the deadliest attack in the nuclear-armed country this year and came with Pakistan’s military and civilian leadership plunged into crisis over the killing of the al Qaeda chief by US commandos on May 2.

The explosions detonated in the Shabqadar Tehsil of Charsadda, as newly trained FC cadets were getting into buses and coaches for a 10-day leave after a training course, and they were wearing civilian clothes, police said.

Shabqadar is about 30 kilometres north of Peshawar, the main city in the northwest region where militants linked to the Taliban and al Qaeda have repeatedly attacked government forces.

Ahmad Ali, a wounded paramilitary policeman, recalled the horror when the explosions turned a festive Friday morning into a bloodbath.

“I was sitting in a van waiting for my colleagues. We were in plain clothes and we were happy we were going to see our families,” he told AFP by telephone from Shabqadar hospital.

“I heard someone shouting ‘Allah Akbar’ and then I heard a huge blast. I was hit by something in my back shoulder. In the meantime I heard another blast and I jumped out of the van. I felt that I was injured and bleeding.”

Police officials confirmed that more than 80 people had been killed, making it the deadliest attack in Pakistan since November 5 when a suicide bomber killed 68 people at a mosque in the northwest area of Darra Adam Khel.

“The suicide bomber came on a motorcycle and blew himself up among the FC personnel. The bomb disposal squad told me the second bomb was planted,” said the police chief of the Charsadda district, Nisar Khan Marwat.

He said that around 20 shops and 12 vehicles were destroyed in the intensity of the blasts and put the death toll at more than 80.

“Most of those killed are FC cadets. Five dead bodies of civilians were taken to the Shabqadar hospital,” he added.

There was no immediate claim of responsibility, but the Pakistani Taliban last week threatened to attack security forces to avenge bin Laden’s killing in a US helicopter raid in Abbottabad.

There has been little public protest in support of bin Laden in a country where more people have been killed in bomb attacks in the past four years than the nearly 3,000 who died in al Qaeda’s September 11, 2001 attacks.

But under growing domestic pressure to punish Washington for the bin Laden raid, Pakistan’s civilian government said Thursday it would review counter-terrorism cooperation with the United States.

It was unclear if the move was intended as a threat, but it showed the extent of the task facing US Senator John Kerry as he prepares to embark on a mission to shore up badly strained ties with Washington’s fractious ally.

Washington did not inform Islamabad that an elite team of Navy SEALs had helicoptered into the garrison town of Abbottabad until the commandos had cleared Pakistani airspace, carrying with them bin Laden’s corpse.

The covert night-time raid has plunged Pakistani politics into turmoil with both President Asif Ali Zardari and Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani facing calls to resign.

Pakistanis have been outraged at the perceived impunity of the US raid, while asking whether their military was too incompetent to know bin Laden was living close to a major forces academy, or, worse, conspired to protect him.

Gilani chaired a defence committee meeting that decided “to institute an inter-agency process to clearly define the parameters of our cooperation with the US in counter-terrorism”, an official statement said.

Washington is pressing Islamabad to investigate how bin Laden and several wives and children managed to live for five years under the noses of its military in Abbottabad, just 40 miles north of Islamabad.

Courtesy : Dawn | AFP.

At least 30 killed, 100 wounded in twin blasts at Dera Ghazi Khan shrine

April 3, 2011

UpdateBombs kill 42 at shrine in Pakistan | Los Angeles Times | April 3, 2011, 11:16 a.m. Reporting from Islamabad, Pakistan— Two suicide bombers killed at least 42 people at a shrine in central Pakistan on Sunday, the latest in a series of attacks on places of worship linked to sects opposed by militants.

The blasts took place at the Sakhi Sarwar shrine in Dera Ghazi Khan – (File Photo)

 

‘Fatal’ blasts at Pakistan Sufi Sakhi Sarwar shrine

BBC || 3 April 2011 Last updated at 13:57 GMT

A Muslim shrine in Pakistan has been hit by two explosions, with unconfirmed reports of casualties.

Officials told reporters at least five people had been killed and 30 more injured in the blasts at a shrine in the Dera Ghazi Khan district of Punjab.

Initial reports said the explosions struck a shrine belonging to Sufis – a minority branch of Islam regarded as heretical by hardliners. Militants attacked another Sufi shrine last year, killing six people.

The latest blasts hit near the Sakhi Sarwar shrine, and devotees were reportedly among the dead and wounded. Thousands of people had been marking the annual festival of Urs at the time of the blasts.

There is no indication of who carried out the attack, although one official said he suspected suicide bombers.

Dawn reports from Multan :

MULTAN: An emergency official says the death toll from a pair of suicide bombings at a shrine in Pakistan has risen to 30.

Thousands of people were visiting the shrine in Dera Ghazi Khan district in Punjab when the bombers struck Sunday.

Emergency coordinator Natiq Hayat says 30 people have been killed and 100 wounded.

Militants believe visiting shrines is against the spirit of Islam and have carried out such attacks in the recent past.

Courtesy: BBC | DAWN.