Posts Tagged ‘pak-india talks’

India-Pakistan Relationship :: A New Hope Always Due.

April 23, 2010

The scale or content of a meeting between Singh and Gilani could be drawn up by Indian Foreign Secretary Nirupama Rao and her Pakistani counterpart, Salman Bashir. – (Dawn File Photo)

India, Pakistan in focus at South Asia summit

Fri, 23 Apr, 2010 | Jumadi-ul-Awwal 08, 1431 | DawnNews.

NEW DELHI: Leaders of India and Pakistan are likely to meet in Bhutan’s capital next week as their nuclear-armed rivalry overshadows a summit of South Asian nations to discuss trade and environment.

India halted peace talks with Pakistan after the November 2008 Mumbai attacks in which 166 people were killed and which India has blamed on Pakistan-based groups.

A meeting between the leaders is seen as crucial because it could help keep alive the idea of engagement between two players whose battle for influence in Afghanistan has a direct bearing on Western efforts to stabilise a region with 1.8 billion people.

“It is an opportunity (to meet) and both sides will take advantage of it,” said a senior Indian government official, who spoke on condition on anonymity.

Indian Foreign Secretary Nirupama Rao said there was “as of now” no offer of a bilateral meeting between Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and his Pakistani counterpart, Yousaf Raza Gilani, but did not completely rule out the possibility of one.

The two sides have been tentative about engaging since their top diplomats met in New Delhi in February but failed to achieve a breakthrough. That meeting, nonetheless, was seen as a small step towards repairing ties.

Differences over the nature of talks have held up a further meeting – Pakistan wants India to restart the peace process; India wants to go slow until Islamabad acts against the Mumbai attack planners.

The United States has been urging the two sides to reduce tension so that Pakistan can focus better on fighting the Taliban on its westers border with Afghanistan.

“I don’t really want to forecast what is going to happen, but let me say: dialogue is always useful, it helps clear the atmosphere, especially between close neighbours such as India and Pakistan,” Rao said before leaving for Bhutan on Friday.

Pakistani Foreign Office spokesman Abdul Basit hinted last week about the possibility of a meeting.

“It has not yet been penciled in. Nevertheless, given that our roadmap also provided for a summit meeting in Bhutan, we look forward to a meaningful engagement with India,” Basit said.

“Let me also underline here, that engaging in meaningful and result-oriented talks is in our mutual interest and in the interest of this region, it is not a favour by Pakistan to India and vice versa.”

COOPERATION UNDERMINED

The scale or content of a meeting between Singh and Gilani could be drawn up by Rao and her Pakistan counterpart, Salman Bashir. Indian officials said hopes of any progress were low.

“Our outlook on the meeting is very clear – it has to be terrorism and what steps Pakistan has taken to bring the perpetrators of Mumbai to book,” a senior Indian official said on condition of anonymity.

The two sides’ unmitigated animosity has undermined greater regional cooperation, an agenda that was the founding principle of the eight-nation bloc of South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) that meets in Bhutan on April 28-29.

Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, the Maldives, Bangladesh and Afghanistan make up the rest of the group.

While SAARC summits are often little more than a backdrop to bilateral meetings between India and Pakistan, the bloc has tried to push forward cooperation in trade and commerce.

Courtesy The Dawn.

Pakistan helps LeT and JuD to achieve its True Goal:: Capture India, not only Kashmir from these 42 ‘terror’ camps.

March 18, 2010

India’s Defense Minister A.K. Antony. – AP (File Photo) L. ……… Pakistani Defense Minister C. A. Mukhtar – CNN (File Photo) R.

Pakistan refuses to close 42 ‘terror’ camps: India

Thu, 18 Mar, 2010 | Rabi-us-Sani 1, 1431

VASCO: India on Wednesday said 42 militant training camps were operating in Pakistan and accused the country’s government of making little effort to close them.

The accusation came after the foreign secretaries of India and Pakistan met last month for the first official talks since the 2008 attacks on Mumbai, which India blames on Pakistani militants.

“There are 42 terror camps in Pakistan (and) all the terrorist camps are active,” Defence Minister A.K. Antony said at a military function in Goa state.

“Pakistan has not taken serious steps to destroy these terror camps,” he said.

India blames the Pakistan-based Islamist group Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT) for the Mumbai attacks, which left 166 people dead and another 300 injured.

The recent talks between the nations resulted only in a promise that both sides would stay in communication.

“As far as the dialogue is concerned, India will explore all possibilities but I don’t expect any miracles,” Antony said.

Pakistani Lashkar’s true goal : India, not only Kashmir.

Aim to set up Islamic state in South Asia: Experts

Ashish Kumar Sen writes from Washington||The Tribune, Chandigarh, India, Sunday, March 14, 2010

Recent actions by Pakistan-based Lashkar-e-Toiba (LeT) have fuelled a belief in Washington that the militant group’s agenda is much broader than a resolution of the Kashmir dispute between India and Pakistan.

At a congressional hearing this week, analysts made the point that LeT would no longer be satisfied if India and Pakistan resolve their differences over Kashmir. Ashley Tellis at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace told the panel of lawmakers that there was no doubt in his mind that a way must be found to settle issues related to Kashmir, but, he added, “I think resolving Kashmir is not going to solve the problems relating to LeT.”

Shuja Nawaz of the Atlantic Council echoed that opinion. “Resolving the Kashmir problem by itself is not going to remove this threat because the aim of these groups is to leverage themselves into a position of power inside Pakistan and to take control,” he said.

Nawaz noted that successive civilian and military leaders in Pakistan had supported LeT as what he described as a “strategic asset” to counter India and force it to negotiate a settlement on Kashmir “by waging a war of… a thousand cuts.”

Over time, LeT took a life of its own, he said, and found the economically backward regions of Pakistan’s Punjab province to be a fertile ground for recruiting militants.

Nawaz said Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) agency lost control of LeT as the group became self-sufficient. “Similar to the disbanding of the Iraqi Army after the US invasion when thousands of trained soldiers and officers were let go, the LeT was cut loose without a comprehensive plan to disarm, retrain, and gainfully employ the fighters,” he added.

Earlier this year, Jamaat-ud-Dawa (JuD) chief Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, the alleged mastermind of the Mumbai attacks, accused India of imposing war on Pakistan by constructing “illegal dams” and diverting the water of Pakistani rivers.

In a fiery diatribe at the launch of a “nationwide protest,” Saeed called upon the Pakistani government to prepare the country to counter this aggression. This focus on water issues has added credence to an opinion held by a growing majority that Kashmir is merely a red herring raised by LeT and its affiliates.

“LeT represents… a Frankenstein’s monster created for the purpose of assisting the Kashmiri freedom movement but that ended up becoming a powerful Sunni Punjabi movement with an independent agenda that appears to have taken on a broader regional role,” Nawaz contended.

Responding to questions raised by congressmen, Tellis said, “I always find it interesting that the people conducting the murder and mayhem (in the valley) today are not Kashmiri. The people who actually are deprived of all their political rights. The murder and mayhem is being conducted by groups that have absolutely no connections to Kashmir. To my mind … the fact that this is a group that has operations in 21 countries, that has an ideology that is completely anti-western, that is opposed to modernity and secularism and all the kinds of values that we take for granted. This group is not going to be satisfied by dealing with the issue of Kashmir.”

While the panel’s co-chair, Dan Burton, Indiana Republican, was insistent that the resolution of Kashmir should be the No. 1 issue for everyone involved, subcommittee chairman Gary Ackerman, New York Democrat, disagreed. Ackerman cautioned against the temptation to think that LeT is interested only in the “liberation” of Kashmir. “The LeT’s true goal is not Kashmir, it is India. And the LeT is not shy about announcing that its intention is to establish an Islamic state in all South Asia. Neither does it hide or try to play down its declaration of war against all Hindus and Jews, who they insist are enemies of Islam,” he said.

Courtesy : DawnNews, AP, The Tribune-Chandigarh and CNN.